Guest Blogger: Geoff Le Pard – The New Me

May I introduce you to Geoff Le Pard, humourist and witty raconteur, entertaining, informative blogger, writer extraordinaire, esteemed Bloggers Bash committee member and baker of… added-sugar-free cake. It was my huge pleasure to meet Geoff at the first Bloggers Bash in summer 2015, at which he took possibly the worst fat photo ever, ever taken of me. Ever. For this, I am extraordinarily grateful. It set me on a path, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Geoff has the dubious honour of being the first in a short series of guest bloggers taking up residence at julielawford.com over the coming weeks, to share real, inspirational stories around weight-loss and lifestyle change.  Geoff has lately got to grips with the product of a career’s worth of lawyer’s lunches. But I’ll let Geoff do the storytelling from here…

The New Me – Geoff Le Pard

Some years ago, a birthday card did the rounds. It showed two woolly sheep with one saying to the other ‘Ewe’s not fat, ewe’s just fluffy.’ That became something of a family joke as I began to add pounds to my waist and my forties slipped past into my fifties.

I was still active but not as active as I had once been; I cycled to and from work daily, I walked at the weekends and I had personal training sessions twice a week. But I also developed a chronic back complaint in my late forties that took time to deal with and my job left me prone to neck and back spasms from too much sitting in meeting rooms, too much hunching over computers. I grew from 12 stone 10 to 14 stone 5 and while I stayed there (mostly) it didn’t go either. I was fit, to an extent, and fat. In clothing terms my waist went from a comfortable 34 inches to a cosy, muffiny 36 inches (and beyond).

There was a brief interval when things changed radically. We got a dog and I began jogging with him round the block and beyond before cycling to work. The dog loathed it. My father became ill and then died inside a year. And I remember talking to a work colleague who had lost weight on the Atkins diet, raving about the benefits of taking carbohydrates out of his diet. Stress, I think, was the precipitant but not eating bread – a lawyer’s lunch usually comprised sandwiches – and the running combined to see me shed a stone.

It didn’t last. The dog’s sour face told me to stop torturing it at 6 am; you can only deconstruct so many sandwiches in a negotiating meeting, eating the cheese and pickle fillings and transferring sticky goo onto draft documents. And I came to terms, after a fashion with my dad’s untimely departure.

I have a bi-annual medical, given my family has examples of both most cancers and heart problems. Latterly the BMI and chest/waist ratios have been going in the wrong directions. But being given numbers and seeing statistical likelihoods doesn’t cut it if, like me, you think of yourself as fit; it’s an ‘increased’ risk of this and that, not a certainty. Then I needed an operation – a hernia – and had a scan. The fatty deposits were only too plain. The surgeon talked candidly about how they might attach to organs so we don’t see the damage they can do. I had to do something but I needed a trigger.

Last summer I had a shock; it was dreadful and I lost my appetite for a while. When I found an equilibrium, I realised I’d lost a bit of weight. So, I reasoned, now was as good a time as any to start a healthier eating and lifestyle regime. I sort of knew, and if I didn’t, Jools’ blog has brought this home to me in a big way, that any changes had to be both incremental and permanent.

I introduced the following:

  • Once again, all bread came out of my diet; I have no meetings now, no need for sandwich lunches; the odd thing is that white flour does not appear to be a problem, it’s the yeast/flour combination that leaves me feeling bloated and sticks to my sides;
  • I eat earlier, no main meals after 7pm and usually at 6;
  • I’m more careful with portion sizes but I still indulge in some seconds;
  • I try and avoid snacking between meals;
  • I reduced the amount of meat I eat;
  • And I’ve been teetotal for 27 years.

I don’t eat as much cake as I did, but I still eat it. I still have puddings and chocolate and they don’t seem to impact my size. Similarly, I drink no less milk than I did, though my breakfast is usually porridge made with coconut or unsweetened almond milk.

Are these sacrifices difficult? Hardly, because there aren’t many. Yes, I miss bread but not so much. It makes it easier that my lifestyle – based at home rather than in an office – lets me both choose when I eat and gives me a greater selection to choose from. And virtue breeds virtue; I eat more vegetarian food, more fish.

The result of all this is that I’m back to just under 13 stone. My clothes don’t fit so I’ve had to buy 34-inch waisted jeans – indeed 32 might be the real size – and I’ve started borrowing my son’s T-shirts. When I went skiing recently I wore his ski gear – it made me look a prannock, but I’m not forking out on yet more stuff.

I worry it won’t stay off but Jools is right when she says you have to assume this is a permanent change. I never had a particular goal in mind and I don’t have a target, so the trap of hitting a goal and slipping back isn’t one I fear especially. I rarely weigh myself but realise one needs to have the evidence if things are slipping, rather than go into denial. So, I’ll be doing that.

And the benefits in terms of being easier to exercise and feeling better how I’m treating myself (and even though I’m 60 now I’m not beyond a little light vanity) make it worthwhile.

  *  *  *

I mentioned Geoff was a writer extraordinaire… Here is his writerly biography:

Geoff Le Pard started writing to entertain in 2006. He hasn’t left his keyboard since. When he’s not churning out novels he writes some maudlin self-indulgent poetry and blogs at geofflepard.com. He walks the dog for mutual inspiration and most of his best ideas come out of these strolls. He also cooks with passion if not precision.

My Father and Other Liars is a thriller set in the near future and takes its heroes, Maurice and Lori-Ann on a helter-skelter chase across continents.

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

 

 

Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle is a coming of age story. Set in 1976 the hero Harry Spittle is home from university for the holidays. He has three goals: to keep away from his family, earn money and hopefully have sex. Inevitably his summer turns out to be very different to that anticipated.

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

 

This 30 story anthology covers many genres: fantasy, romance, humour, thriller, espionage, conspiracy theories, MG and indeed something for everyone. All the stories were written during Nano 2015

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

 

Salisbury Square is a dark thriller set in present day London where a homeless woman and a Polish man, escaping the police at home, form an unlikely alliance to save themselves.

This is available here

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

 

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Author: Jools

Abundant, Bold, Confident, Determined, Empathetic, Forthright, Grumpy, Healthier, Individual, Just me, Kind, Loving, Mellifluous, Natural, Optimistic, imPatient, Quirky, Real-world, Single-minded, unTreatable, Unwound, Verbal, Wilful, eXtraordinary, Young and old, Zero-tolerance.

11 thoughts on “Guest Blogger: Geoff Le Pard – The New Me”

    1. Ha! I’m just so delighted that you were happy to take up ‘pole position’ in my mini guest blogger season. And I hope your post introduces a barrage of new readers to the delights of your writing. Thanks again, Geoff. I owe you. 😊

    1. He is indeed! And I’m delighted he was pleased to participate here. And, Ritu… ahem… I just might be dropping you a line on the same matter over the weekend. Be gentle with me 🙃

      1. Aw Jools! I’d be delighted! In fact if you give me details sooner rather than later I can work on it… today! I’m still off work so have time!!! 😘😘😘

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