Facebook Advert – Trial Run #ammarketing

I ‘boosted’ a post on Facebook, essentially an advert for Singled Out. Here’s how I got on.

I haven’t done much advertising/promotion of Singled Out, outside this blog and a few Tweets.  I have neither the time, nor the dedication to go about this task with the sort of commitment one needs to apply if one wants sales in the thousands. Besides, as we hear everywhere, the best way to promote a first book… is to write a second. And that’s just what I’ve at last started to do.

But I was persuaded to try out a boosted post on Facebook, mainly on the basis that it didn’t involve any effort at all.  I was a few copies short of my first notable sales milestone – 100 copies – and I simply thought, ‘it’s worth a punt’. A friend (thank you, Suzanne) showed me how it worked, and it took about 10 minutes to set up the post and pick my target group. Facebook steps you through the process, nice and simple.

I didn’t have a suitable post on my blog, so I decided simply to link to the Amazon.co.uk page for Singled Out, here.

Here’s the post, as it appeared:

Screenshot 2015-08-20 09.49.05

As it’s a story set on a holiday, it seemed worthwhile to target people setting off on, or even already on, their holidays. A #nobrainer one might say.

I decided on a very modest budget, £10.00, and ran the ad over 6 days. This was my criteria:

  • Target group: Women in the UK aged between 35-60
  • Stated interests: fiction, suspense novels, single person, Turkey, travel
  • Placement: Desktop and Mobile news feed

Across the 6 days, this post was boosted to 2,297 women in the target group.  There were 63 engagements. That means 63 people either liked my page, commented on the advert, or – best of all – clicked through to the Amazon page.  My stats tell me that 51 people clicked through to the page.  That means my cost per result was £0.16.

During those 6 days, I made 6 sales, and a further sale the day after – a total of 7 sales attributed to this promotion. Yes, I know, It’s small potatoes, compared to some lucky/successful/hard-working authors, but together with a few sales earlier in the month, it served to make August my most successful month for sales since March, the month after Singled Out was launched.

So… the 7 sales I can directly attribute to the Facebook post more than covered that £10 investment.  Happy days. But the significant thing that post did, was to take me over 100 sales.  That doesn’t mean much in the big wide world, but it was important to me, and definitely worth the punt.

In the interests of full disclosure, I tried a second Facebook boost immediately the first ended. I used the same advert and selected different criteria. I ran for 6 days again, but I invested a budget of just £5.00 this time, half the original budget. My target group was male rather than female, and I was more restrictive with my stated interests. I know… I shouldn’t have adjusted two criteria at once, but I did.

  • Target group: Men in the UK aged between 35 and 60
  • Stated interests: suspense novels, psychological novel, single person, Turkey
  • Placement: Desktop and Mobile news feed

This time I was less successful. With a tighter focus, the available audience was smaller, a total of 858 people reached, from which there were 12 engagements – 3 likes and 9 website clicks. And one sale – which was very gratifying!  Facebook tells me my cost per result (ie, engagement) was £0.42.

So…

  • Of 2297 women, 51 clicked the website – that’s 1 in every 45, or just under 2% – that’s not bad for a ‘cold’ contact. What’s better though, is that of those 51 women, 13% made a purchase.
  • Of 863 men, 9 clicked the website – that’s one in every 95, or half as many as the women’s group. But that 1 sale is, technically speaking, 10% of the click-through traffic to the website.

I messed around with my keywords, but that was in an attempt to be more targeted with the men. It didn’t pay off.

I can’t say I’m surprised that women engaged more enthusiastically with my post than men. That would be for any number of reasons that I can guess at. But I can’t really speculate without generalising horribly, and I don’t want to do that.

This was just a trial. The numbers were all very small and my investment was tiny – but I didn’t feel that was inappropriate, given my relatively modest sales to date. I would try another Facebook advert in future – the results justify tweaking those keywords, investing again, trying a broader geographic spread, and so on. But I can’t exactly see Facebook shooting my sales into the stratosphere.

If you’re a self-published author who’s been thinking of trying Facebook adverts, I hope this has been useful.

And if you’re one of the lovely ladies who clicked on that link and have found your way to my blog… let me extend you a big, warm welcome. 🙂